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APRIL 2008 continued | APRIL 2007

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Daphne serica / Seidenhaariger Seidelbast - This is a beautiful shrub is usually found in the mountains.  This one was photographed on the meadow below Karfi.  The flowers are fragrant and have a silky texture, hence the name ‘serica’ – silk.  New blooms are pink fading to a creamy apricot as they age.

Dikte - A view of Mount Dikte from the meadows below Karfi – an idyllic spot especially when there is still snow on the peaks.

Centaurium pulchellum / Lesser centaury / Kleines Tausendguldenkraut

Myosotis refracta / Forget-me-not / Vergissmirnicht - This small forget-me-not was photographed on the Lassithi plateau late in the afternoon and I doubted that the photograph would be OK.  It is however a good representation of this delicate and tiny flower which is easily overlooked.

Gagea peduncunlaris / Langstieliger Gelbstern - This pretty little yellow/green flower has delicate tepals which seem to damage easily.

Ophrys heldreichii / Heldreich’s Ophrys / Heldreichs Ragwurz - I never tire of photographing this brightly coloured ophrys.  Colours and patterning vary so much from plant to plant, and each looks more attractive than the last!

Orchis italica / Italian Orchid / Italienisches Knabenkraut - This year I have seen more O. italica than ever before.  A quiet track near Limnes had an overwhelming number of these lovely orchids – so many that the bank which ran alongside the road was covered with hundreds of beautiful pale pink spikes.

Orchis pauciflora / Sparsely flowering orchid / Wenigblütiges Knabenkraut - Such a lovely combination of pale cream and yellow – this little orchid is a delight – particularly in such abundance as here on the Katharo Plateau.

Orchis tridentata / Three-toothed orchid / Dreizähniges Knabenkraut - To distinguish this orchid from milky orchid O. lactea it is necessary to look at the dome.  The sepals do not completely close together in O. tridentata and the tips form three teeth, giving the orchid its name. A useful clue is a more ragged appearance than O. lactea, at first glance
 
   
 
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